Jun 072017
 

WW84ALots of writing news this week.

First, I’ve been listening to some new podcasts about writing.  (Well, new to me, anyway…)  They are less about the craft of writing itself, and more about the business side.  By the way, if you’re a writer, and want to hear some good tips about marketing and sales, try David Wood’s “Wood on Words” podcast.  The other one I’ve just started listening to is “Authorcast”, co-hosted by (again) David Wood and Alan Baxter.

I also got a chance to read (and blurb) an ARC of Ed Lorn’s upcoming novel, The Sound of Broken Ribs.  It is definitely Lorn at his best.  If you like horror so twisted that you can’t tell the good guys from the bad, then this is definitely one to watch for.  Fair warning though, Lorn holds nothing back.  If you need trigger warnings, just assume they are all given.

And that brings me to something that I said I was going to start doing a LONG time ago, but never actually did.  I’ll be reviewing books as I read them.  I can’t hold to a schedule with this.  Mainly because I simply won’t review anything I read that I can’t recommend.  That means I won’t be reviewing anything that I don’t consider at least a four-star book.  That’s not to say I won’t end up reading some clunkers, but when I do, I simply won’t review them.

This also means I won’t be telling anyone in advance what titles I’m reading.  After all, if I mention that I’m reading XYZ by Joe Blow Author, and then I don’t review it, you would know I didn’t consider it worth the effort.

Other news…

End Point Pangaea is off to the publisher.  Well, technically, “Pangaea Exiles” is off to the publisher.  In the end (no pun intended), the “End Point Pangaea” title just didn’t work for me.  I started writing the story with the idea that there would be a single location around which the story would be centered, and for whatever reason, I initially had it in my mind that it would be called “End Point”.  I don’t know why it came to me like that, but as the story grew, the idea of a single location was just too unbelievable, as well as too confining for the series.  So when I sent the manuscript to the publisher, I also requested that we change the title.  We’ll see what they say.

Year 12Y12 is officially going to be an audiobook, and Corey Snow (aka VoxMan) has officially accepted the offer.  Of course, it’s all dependent on his schedule, as he is booked through some point in June.  That means that will be the earliest he can start on it.  But I’m just so happy that Corey will once again be the voice of the Half Past Midnight universe that waiting a bit longer is NOT going to be a problem.

Crazy Larry – While I wait on word (and the inevitable edits) from the publisher for the Pangaea project, I’m going to be hammering away at Crazy Larry.  I know I promised several of you that my next project would be the next Amber Payne book (Payne and Suffering), but when I spoke to Corey about voicing Y12, he indicated that he would also be interested in doing Crazy Larry, and wanted to know when it would be ready.  There’s absolutely no way it will be ready by his June opening, but I might be able to finish the first draft and get it to beta readers in a few weeks.  After that though, it will need to go to editing, get a cover, etc.  Too many of those steps are outside of my control, so I expect CL will likely still be a few months out.

Payne and Suffering – And just because P&S isn’t going to be my primary WIP for a while, that doesn’t mean I won’t be working on it at all.  Two chapters are already done, and I will continue to work on it as time permits. My plan is to have more Amber Payne in your hands by late fall.

WW84BRPotW

And this week’s pic is one to give you a few shivers. I was working in the garage last week when I moved a box away from the wall and found this little lady.  Now, I’m not normally one who believes in killing snakes or spiders on sight, and I don’t have any sort of phobia with them.  But a black widow is NOT something that I will leave alive around my home.   I snapped the picture so I could be sure of the identification (the spider was around the corner, and so it was difficult to get a direct look at it), and when I zoomed the picture in and saw that my suspicions were correct, I got the bug spray and sent the deadly girl to “the bleedin’ choir invisible”.  That means that this pic is now the only record that she ever existed, and I have to admit that I’m completely comfortable with that.  If you love spiders and think I shouldn’t have killed her, just send me your mailing address and from now on, I’ll make it a point to jar them up and send you the next ones I find.  Of course, you’ll have to cover the postage.  :wink:

That’s it for now, except my reminder to stay safe.  And I’ll talk to you again soon.   :bye:

May 242017
 

WW83We lost a good friend this weekend… a member of the family.  She was a pretty girl who was as loving as she was stubborn.  In the end, it was the stubborn that got her.  But I suppose we all have our faults, don’t we?

Cricket loved her family, of this I have no doubt.  She loved having her belly rubbed, as most dogs do, her ears were silky soft, and she had eyes that you couldn’t  help but smile at.  For those of you who have followed me for a while, you may recall that Bella and Cricket have had a long history of getting into dominance fights.  It got so bad last year that they had three bad fights in three months, and we were so afraid for Cricket’s safety that we actually tried to find another home for her.  The problem was that even though she was half Bella’s size, she was the one who kept pushing for dominance, which resulted in increasingly severe fights between the girls.

When MBH found a description of our problem in a book about dog behavior therapy, we found out that we had unwittingly been the cause of those fights.  We had two dogs of the same sex whom we treated equally.  We treated them like children.

Here’s a word of warning, people.  Dogs don’t think the same way we do.  Deep in our minds, we know that they are pack animals, and that they adopt us as members of the pack.  But all too often, we don’t know what this really means.  We call ourselves alphas, without understanding that this implies a ranking system.

The book explained that you can’t treat all dogs equally.  If you don’t establish which dog is dominant in the pack, they will often try to figure it out for themselves.  And the way they do that is by fighting.

We began a recommended training regimen, putting ourselves above them by not allowing them on the furniture, and not allowing ourselves to get on the floor with them.  Some of the fights had occurred when we were sitting on the floor with them, or when one of them was on the furniture with us.  According to the information we read, this encouraged them to think of themselves as our equals.  We refused to pet them when they nudged our hands (and this one was really tough) because it meant that they were initiating the affection, in essence telling us what to do.

We stopped petting them at all unless they first “earned” the affection by sitting, laying down, or in some other way doing as they were told.  This taught them that good behavior was rewarded.

And for the safety of the whole pack, we had to choose one dog to be dominant over the other.  Since it was painfully obvious that Bella could kill Cricket if it came down to it, we picked Bella as “top dog”.  We fed Bella first, let her go to bed first, walked her in front of Cricket… even showed Bella affection first.  It was hard not to think of the new regimen as “cold” or “mean”, but dogs are more comfortable with an established pecking order.  And while it was difficult not to love on the cute little girl when she looked up at you with those eyes, we had to realize that the reason we did it was to keep her from picking fights that she couldn’t win.

And it seemed to work.  Their last fight was almost a year ago… until this weekend.

We got complacent.  They had behaved so well for so long that we felt it was under control.  When Cricket got a “hot spot” on her tail and flank, we could tell she was hurting some, so we felt sorry for her.  When I saw her on the couch, instead of a stern scolding, I shooed her off with a voice that was almost apologetic.  When we doctored her hot spot, we once again treated her like we would a sick child, comforting her and showing her affection without always doing the same for Bella.

We weren’t in the room when the fight started this time, so we don’t know for sure which dog started it.  All we know is that it started on the furniture, where neither of them was supposed to be.  Even if we had seen it start, that doesn’t necessarily mean we would know what really happened.  There are unspoken cues between animals that we humans simply don’t have the capacity to understand.  At one point last year, I thought Bella was the one starting the fights.  I later realized that Bella was silently being challenged by Cricket, when the smaller dog would claim Bella’s bed as her own, or in some other subtle way try to assert dominance on her larger packmate.

So perhaps Cricket was on the couch, challenging Bella.  Or maybe Bella was trying to assert her dominance over Cricket, and so attacked Cricket.  What we do know is that Cricket has always been the more aggressive of the two.  Bella has always been our marshmallow with people, even refusing to bite either of us in the midst of their fighting when we’re trying to break them up.

Not so with Cricket.  When she started fighting, she would tear into anything or anyone within reach of her teeth, and I have the scars to prove it.  Like I said, we all have our faults.  Whatever the reason, they got into it again, and this time she was wounded too severely.  The vet told us she might live, but that she was unlikely to fully recover.  She also warned us that the fights were likely going to continue to get progressively worse.  In the end, we had to make the hard decision.

So we loved on her the way she always wanted, and we cried as she left us.  Hell, I’m crying now as I write this.  But we got several good years with her.  I’ll try to concentrate on that.

The irony now is that Bella keeps going through the house, as if looking for Cricket.  She’s still limping a little – she didn’t get out unscathed, by any means.  But she doesn’t give the impression that she’s stalking an enemy.  I’ve heard it said that dogs don’t hold grudges for most things, and I think for Bella that must be true.  I don’t know if I’m just putting my thoughts into her actions, but to me it looks like she’s wondering where her pack mate has gone.  She goes from room to room, and afterward she’ll come find me and lay down on the floor where she can keep an eye on me.

Yeah, we’re going through a rough patch here at the Brackett household.  So I mean this with all my heart… love your family, love your pack.  Not just in a way that makes you feel good, but in whatever way they actually need.

And stay safe.   :weep:

Here’s the way I’ll remember her.  (Our Girls Playing 20161016_091056)

May 172017
 

WW82BShame on me.  Two weeks without a blog post.  But it’s been a busy two weeks.  We’ve had storm after storm here, one of which actually had me grabbing the dogs and ducking into a neighbor’s storm shelter.  You may have seen the news about the tornadoes in the Tulsa area.  This makes the second year that we’ve had to take shelter, although this year was admittedly much less dangerous.  We got plenty of rain, hail, and high winds, and I heard that a couple of small tornadoes touched down within a few miles of the house.  But it was nothing like the one last year, where we actually saw a tornado as it made its way past us.

Still, when those warning sirens started going off, I was considerably less inclined to wait until the last minute this time.  Even then, I got completely soaked going from the front door to the car… even more so going from the car to the storm shelter.  For the most part, the storm blew through pretty quickly, though. The picture here is of the mammatus cloud formation (see Suzanne? I remembered!) that was on the trailing edge of the system as it left our area to terrorize other parts of the country.

In other news…

EPPEnd Point Pangaea is pretty much done.  To be honest, I thought it was complete until I got these last few beta reads.  Some of the readers had some very cogent comments that I really have to address.  The biggest issue is going to require an additional scene that I hope to complete writing tomorrow.  I’ve spent the last few days clarifying other problems.  But the end is approaching rapidly.

Y12 – And I’m excited to announce that Corey Snow has tentatively agreed to put his voice talents back to work in the Half Past Midnight universe.  Corey is the voice actor who did the audiobooks for Half Past Midnight, and The Road to Rejas and his work was so fantastic that it was hard for me to imagine anyone else voicing Year 12.  So imagine how disappointed I was when I found that he no longer did royalty share jobs.  And after having taken so long between books, I was in no financial position to pay up front for him.  But after exchanging a few emails, he has agreed to make an exception.  If all goes according to plan, he will begin work on the audiobook version of Y12 next month, as well as Crazy Larry when it’s done.  Watch for future updates.   :)

That’s all for now.  Time to get back to writing. So stay safe everyone.  I’ll talk to you again soon.   :bye:

 

Oh!  RPotW – WW82C

For this week’s Random Pic of the Week, let’s go less random and more thematic.  Since I’ve already posted a picture from the back edge of the storm system from last week, let me post another from two days before that storm.  Details on the pic tell me it was 7:10 PM on May 9th.  MBH and I were walking the dogs, and we commented on how pretty the clouds were at the time.  Pretty, but also a bit unusual.  As you can see, the day was beautiful and I mentioned that the clouds ahead of us looked like a giant thunderbird.

Hmmm… in retrospect, maybe it was a giant thunderbird, and he was a warning of the storm to come.  Yep, there’s the old writer’s brain kicking in again.   :)

For a better look at the formation, click on the picture.

Take care.   :bye:

May 042017
 

ww49If you want to know when I’m about to release a new title, please take a moment and sign up using the form below. I will ONLY email you when I’m putting a title on sale, getting ready to release a new title, or when I actually release a new title. Also, I will absolutely never EVER share, sell, or in any other way distribute your contact information.

So if you want to keep up with what’s new with my writing, please consider dropping your name and email address into the form below.

I’ll talk to you later.   :bye:

 Posted by at 9:40 pm
Apr 272017
 

WW81Another late post.  Sorry folks, but yesterday just got away from me.   :idk:  Chalk it up to the fact that MBH had to go out of town, which meant she needed me to take her to work (because her flight didn’t leave until after noon, and she could still work half a day before going to the airport). Or maybe it was due to the fact that a nasty storm blew through the night before, setting off our tornado watch alerts shortly after we got to sleep, and costing us a few precious hours of sleep.  (The pic to the left is radar from about an hour after the worst of it was past.)  Or perhaps it was because I was busy organizing beta readers and getting EPP ready to send out to them.  Whatever the reason, I blew it and forgot to write my WW post.

So here it is…

First, as mentioned above, the rough draft of End Point Pangaea is off to beta readers.  The urge to keep working on it… to keep tweaking it… was hard to ignore.  There is always something more that you feel the need to clarify or add.  But I finally had to tell myself that this is the rough draft, and beta readers don’t need it to be perfect.  As a matter of fact, beta readers add an unbiased eye to the manuscript, usually catching things that the author simply cannot see by virtue of the fact that the eye of the writer will usually see what he intended to write, rather than what he wrote.  So it’s often wasted effort trying to “fix” things in the rough draft.  You (or at least I) can spend all sorts of time working on something that you want to get just right, only to find that half of your beta readers have found another problem that makes your re-writes moot.  Eventually, you have to accept the fact that it’s never going to be perfect.  As the saying goes, art is never complete, it’s just finally abandoned.

WW81BThis morning I awoke to find that one of the beta readers has already finished it, and as of a few minutes ago, she has already sent a reply email and tracked changes on the manuscript.  Wow!  Talk about a fast turn around!   :shock:

I suppose that means I should get back to work, though.  So we’ll make this another short blog post.  But before I go, how about this week’s RPotW?  Here’s a cute puppy pic for you.  This is Tilly.  She’s a French Bulldog puppy, and we met her last week while walking the dogs.  She’s about as cute as she could be, and ran right up to us while we were walking.  As I’ve mentioned before, our girls are not the most social of dogs when it comes to people outside of our pack, whether they have two legs or four, so we were concerned that they would misbehave when she approached.  There were a couple of tense moments while we made sure Bella and Cricket sat and stayed, but it honestly looked like they were all right with her.  We just didn’t want to take any chances.

So smile at the cute puppy, (how could you not?) and have a great week, everyone.  Stay safe, and I’ll talk to you again soon.   :bye: