Dec 012016
 

ww63a-copyHope you all had a wonderful Thanksgiving – at least, those of you who celebrated it last week. My Canadian friends are likely looking down here to the US thinking, late to the party again, eh? (Heavy emphasis on the “eh”.)   :laugh:  But for those of us here in the US, we just finished our Thanksgiving, and immediately began the after-party madness that is Christmas decorating.

Yep, MBH is a traditionalist. The day after Thanksgiving is always the day we put up Christmas decorations. Honestly, I would probably be a bit of a Scrooge if not for her, but I love seeing how happy it makes her to put up the tree, and garland, and the lights and all the admitted cheeriness that also is Christmas decorating. And she does a great job with it (and I’m not just saying that because I know she’ll read this later.)  :-)   I mean, just look at the tree!

ww63b-copyOf course, for the girls, the tree is just something new for them to sniff at and figure out.  Is it an intruder? A piece of furniture? A chew toy? And evidently, at least part of it fell into the latter category. I had to take MBH’s car into the dealership yesterday to address a recall on the rear suspension.  Five hours after they started the two and a half hour job, I finally got out of there, only to come home and find that some of the insides of the new tree skirt, had mysteriously migrated to the outside of the new tree skirt.

Yeah, see that puff of white in the bottom of the pic there?  And if you look closely, you’ll see a little more back behind the tree, and the little tear where the skirt spontaneously erupted, spewing its guts onto the floor. When I walked into the house and saw it, of course I wondered aloud what had happened.

ww63c-copyAnd for some strange reason, when I asked Cricket about it, she immediately rolled onto her back.  I could almost hear her telling me, “Really Dad!  It jumped up and attacked me!  It was all self-defense! Honest!”  It was all I could do not to laugh at her attempts to apologize.

As for writing news…

Y12 – Year 12 has gone through two rounds with the editor and it off to the final proofreader. After that, it comes back here, where I add the front and back matter (dedication, acknowledgements, etc.) and then send it off for formatting.  And at that point, it should be ready to publish.  Woot!

Oh! And speaking of Year 12, I let those of you on my mailing list get a sneak peek at the cover a couple of weeks ago.  For those of you who aren’t on the list, I guess I can finally let you take a look, as well.   ;)  Here are all three titles in the Half Past Midnight universe, so you can see them all together.all

 

Hat tip to Glendon Haddix at Streetlight Graphics, for the outstanding cover work.  He did all three covers here, as well as much of the work on my Streets of Payne covers.

EPPEnd Point Pangaea is back on the front burner as my primary WIP.  I stumbled for a few days after being away from it while working on Y12 edits and then the holidays. When you’re gone from something like that for a while, you tend to forget the characters and plot twists that you’re trying to weave through the story.  So it took me a couple of days to regain the momentum.  But I’m back in, and the story is flowing well, once more.

CLCrazy Larry is a planned novella I’m working on.  It’s another HPM title – the story of what happened to Larry Troutman after Leeland left him on D-day. So far, I’m about 8000 words into it.  And while it’s planned as a novella, it’s beginning to feel as if it might just be a bit shorter.  I’ll just have to see where the story takes me.

And that’s it for now. Time to get back to work. So stay safe, and I’ll talk to you next time.   :bye:

 

Nov 092016
 

ww61-bAll right, I’ve always promised you that I wouldn’t get political here on the blog.  So here’s all I’ll say about yesterday’s election…

Thank Ghu, it’s over.  Hmmm… that makes a pretty good acronym – TGIO!  Maybe I could start a new trend… hashtag TGIO.  Before you know it, we’ll be seeing #TGIO all over the internet.  You think?

No? (sigh)

All right. Then on with the writing news, and it’s going to be a quick post, because I still have a LOT of work to do.

CV1 – As you can see, I just got the completed cover art for the print version of Chucklers: Volume 1 and I’m really happy with how it turned out.  The folks at Severed did an amazing job.  In other news, I just saw that CV1 got its first review, and it’s a 5-star!  Woohoo!  So thank you, “Emmet”, whoever you are.  I’m glad you liked it.

Y12Year 12 edits are ongoing, slower than I would like, but that’s mainly due to me getting distracted by life.  Every time I get on a roll, I end up having to review this, or approve that.  It’s almost like this writing stuff is a job, or something. :idk:  But for the moment, rolling through the Y12 edits is my main priority.  However, I did manage to shoot out a quick cover reveal of the Y12 cover today.  If you’re on the mailing list, you should already have it in your mailbox.  If you aren’t, well, first of all, why aren’t you?  And secondly, maybe I’ll give you a peek at it next week.   ;-)

And that’s it for now.  Like I said, lots of work to do…

So stay safe, and I’ll talk to you again next time.   :bye:

Sep 142016
 

ww56Just a short post today.  I have a lot of irons in the fire, and all of them need tending.

I just found out today that my oldest granddaughter won her classroom spelling bee, yesterday.  Yay!   :)  The word was “concrete”, and I’m sorta tickled.  Who knows?  Maybe she’ll be a writer some day.  LOL.

On the writing front, I’m juggling two first drafts, and waiting for word from the publisher on Chucklers – Book 1.  Until recently, I’ve been pushing mainly on End Point Pangaea, and pretty much ignoring Year 12.  But considering how long it seems to take going through a publisher, I’ve decided to begin concentrating more on Year 12.  Money’s getting too tight, and I’ve got to do something to get an income stream going.  I’ve thought about my options, and since Y12 is going to be self-pubbed, it will take less time to get it edited, published, and start earning revenue.

So that’s taking most of my time now.  I know I’ll be jumping back and forth at times between Y12 and EPP, but Y12 will have to be my main project for a while.

In addition, watch for a new short story out in the near future.  In 2012, I had a short story published in an anthology called Explorers: Beyond the Horizon.  That story was The Burning Land, and it was pretty well received. The rights to the story reverted back to me last year, and I’ve been toying with the idea of self-publishing it since that time.

Of course, the catch to self publishing is the fact that you have to pay for editing, formatting, and cover art on your own, then hope you make enough in sales to earn that investment back.  Editing is usually the biggest cost, but this one was already edited before it went into the anthology.  The second biggest cost is usually cover design.  And in order to publish The Burning Land, I would have to invest money in a cover for it.  And since it’s a short story, I wouldn’t feel right charging more than Amazon’s 99¢ minimum price.

Now, if you aren’t an author, you may not know this, but Amazon slants their percentages to encourage authors to charge $2.99 or more.  The way it works is that an author charging $2.99 or more, gets to keep 70% of the money earned on the story.  Anything below the $2.99 price point only earns 35%.  AND they don’t allow you to charge less than 99¢ at all (with a very few, tricky exceptions).

So if I were to get a decent cover for this short story, it would likely cost me a couple of hundred dollars.  Let’s call it $150, for now, just for giggles.  If I charge the minimum of 99¢ for the story, for each copy sold, I get back 34¢.  At that rate, I would have to sell nearly 450 copies just to break even, and since short stories by unknown authors don’t sell well to begin with, that would take more time than it’s really worth.

But last month I won a contest.  The prize was a free cover by author and cover artist Denise Lhamon.  Woohoo!  And that means that I can afford to publish TBL after all.  So while it won’t make me rich, by any means, it will mean at least a little money in the coffers while I continue working on the other books.

That’s all I have for now. Time to get back to work. So stay safe, and I’ll talk to you again next week.   :bye:

Aug 242016
 

Children often have trouble when they’re learning to speak, and some of those troubles lead to fun little sayings that stick with your family for many years. Most of you have probably experienced this. A prime example in our family is when my oldest daughter was about nine. At that age, she used to occasionally mix up song lyrics, as we’ve all done from time to time. But some of hers were so memorable that they became ingrained in the family history. For instance, the chorus to the old song “When Smoky Sings” by ABC, begins with the line “when Smoky sings, I hear violins.” To this day, my wife and I can’t think of that song without remembering it as “when smokin’s a sin, I hear firemen…”   :rotfl:

When my son was at that stage of his life, he had trouble with “yesterday”. For him, moving back in time consisted of going from today, to this morning, to last night, to “lasterday”, (which does have a kind of logic to it, right?)

For a great-niece, dogs were “goggers”. And for our youngest daughter, the color yellow was “lellow.”  (Ironically, she just got her BFA in painting, and depends quite a bit on the color palette.)

Now we’re on the next generation. When my oldest granddaughter was younger, and still learning to talk, she loved penguins. But for whatever reason, the word “penguin” evaded her grasp. Instead, she called them “poogins”. My dad loved that so much, that he began calling her Poogin, and even though that was a good four or five years ago, she still remains “Poogin” to us.

Well, now she’s nine years old, just starting fourth grade. As a matter of fact, last week was her first week back in school after summer vacation. When we spoke to our “smokin’s a sin” daughter, we asked her how Poogin liked the fourth grade. She told us that she had asked the same question when she’d picked the little one up after her first day. And with all the drama that a nine-year-old can muster, she related the tragedy of her first day…

“It was absolutely horrible!”

“Why? What happened?”

“I lost my tooth!”

“Well, that’s all right. You’ve lost teeth before.”

“No mom, I lost my tooth… and then I lost my tooth!”

“Oh. You mean you lost it, lost it?”

Poogin nodded woefully. “Somewhere on the playground. I looked and looked, but I couldn’t find it.”

“Well that’s okay, baby.”

“No it’s not. How is the tooth fairy going to know I lost it, if I don’t have it to put under my pillow?”

:-D

You have to understand, Poogin is a very smart young lady who speaks with a vocabulary beyond her years. That conversation was a reminder that, while she might speak with the conviction and vocabulary of a teenager, she still has the beliefs of a nine-year-old. We got a good chuckle out of her mom relating that the tooth fairy was a lot like Santa Claus, and that she would know about the tooth, whether it was actually under the pillow or not.

WW53aBut the real kicker was when Poogin decided that just to be safe, she should leave a note for the tooth fairy…

Dear tooth<>fairy,

I have lost a tooth today, (literaly) but if you are still generous enouph, mabe you could still give me the money. (‘.

So does the mercenary nature of the note come from the child, or the adult struggling to come out?   :-))  Either way, I love the fact that she didn’t simply give up on the lost tooth, and that she turned to writing as a solution.  She’s a Poogin after my own heart.   8-)

And speaking of writing… (how’s that for a segue?) …another round of edits for the first Chucklers book is done.  Better yet, I received an email with a proposed new cover on it, and it’s looking really good, folks. I sent back a request for a few tweaks, but I think we’re quickly approaching a publishable product.  Woohoo!! Want a sneak peek?  Here you go….WW53b

How’s that for a tease?  :-D

My other big project, End Point Pangaea, is still moving well (you can see the progress meter at the top of the column to the far right), and though I did stall for a couple of days, I’m back on that horse and riding for all I’m worth.  I’m still waiting for that magical mental and emotional breakthrough where everything falls into place just right, and I’m suddenly consistently breaking the 2500 word a day mark.  So far, I haven’t seen that breakthrough.

And I can tell you that today isn’t very likely to be it, either.   ;-)   But the progress is consistent, and I’m happy with it, as it is.  Of course, just like my Poogin, at the end of the day I just can’t help myself.  When it’s all said and done, I just really want to see that big payoff.   :rotfl:

But that’s not going to happen if I don’t get back to writing.  So take care, and stay safe everyone.  I’ll talk to you again next week.   :bye:

Jul 052013
 

First of all, I hope everyone had a wonderful 4th of July.  Ours was pretty uneventful, other than the fireworks making the dogs nervous all evening and most of the night.  It wasn’t too bad on them, but they pretty much refused to leave my wife’s side from about eight or nine, until well after bedtime.  :)

Now, truthfully, I started writing this entry a couple of days before the 4th, and at the time I started, I had book covers on the mind.  It was a topic that had been on my mind quite a bit, since I went through so much on the cover for Streets of Payne (read about some of it here).  Then I think back to the issues I had with the cover for Half Past Midnight.  HPM was my first venture into writing, so I suppose mistakes were to be expected.  But even taking that into account, there were plenty of problems.  And that gave me the idea that some of the rest of you might have encountered similar issues.  Or perhaps you’re coming up on that part of your work in progress and you’d like to see some of the pitfalls I went through so you can (hopefully) avoid making the same mistakes.  Or, maybe you just want a good chuckle at my expense.  :rotfl:   Hey, I don’t blame you.  Looking back on some of what I did, I find it pretty amusing, too.

But let’s make this a lesson entry.  That’s what this blog is supposed to be about, right? Doesn’t it say so right at the top of my blog? “JL Brackett – Learning to Write“.   So here we go…

I’ll start by looking back at my first novel, Half Past Midnight.  I made several mistakes with that one, spending much more than was necessary to get it published.  But it was a learning experience, and it was fun.  Specifically addressing the topic of the cover, I have to shake my head.  I probably put that poor cover artist through hell before we finally got something acceptable.  I mean, all the poor guy knew about my book at the time was that it was something about a nuclear war, and it was post-apocalyptic.  And armed only with that limited amount of knowledge, here are some of the first cover samples he submitted to me:

Walk on a roof edgeWalk on a roof edgeWalk on a roof edgeWalk on a roof edgeNeedless to say, I was disappointed.  How could he miss the mark so completely? Didn’t he know what I was trying to accomplish here?  It was almost as if he hadn’t read the book at all!  And that was when I realized… he hadn’t.

It was a rookie mistake.  I assumed either the publisher or the cover artist had read my book and would know what artwork would work best.  That is NOT the case!  If you’re an indie, and you’re hiring freelancers to do your cover art and publishing, they will most likely never read your work.  That leads me to:

Cover art lesson #1 – Don’t be timid!  Get involved in every aspect of your book.  No one knows what you’re trying to accomplish better than you do.  It’s up to you to carry that vision forward from beginning, to end.  All the way to the end!

So I contacted the artist and we discussed why these proposed covers just weren’t going to work.  He was extremely understanding, and taught me how to go to various stock photo sites and create light boxes with pictures that I thought incorporated part of what I wanted on my cover.  I spent the next several days going over picture after picture, until I found something that I thought incorporated the “feel” that I wanted on my cover.  It was a picture of a young woman with an AK47 resting on her shoulder.  She stood in the middle of an empty field, and she looked dirty, bone weary, and down-trodden.  She reminded me of the character of Megan in my book.  I sent that to him and told him what I had in mind.  That was when I learned what a decent cover artist can do with photo manipulation.  I spoke to him about backgrounds, and the fact that in the book, Megan used a crossbow, and that a lot of the fighting took place under cover of darkness.  After a few conversations, and a couple of final tweaks, he finally created this outstanding cover.

In the meantime, though, the editing was complete, and the publishing files were done.  I had waited too long to have the cover art done, and now I had a book ready to publish, and had to wait for the cover.

Cover art lesson #2 – Learn to manage the timing of publication.  There are some tasks that are prerequisite to others.  For instance, the book must be written before it can be edited, and it must be edited before it can be formatted for publication.  However, the cover art can be done as soon as you know your novel’s theme, tone, setting, and characters.  Once you have a feel for what you want on the cover, I recommend that you begin working towards getting your cover done.  This will eliminate the frustration of having your novel written, edited, and files ready for publication while you have to wait on your cover.

Megan w crossbowSo I finally got the artist everything he needed and within a matter of days he sent me a preliminary cover.  A few tweaks, and we had a cover I was happy with.  Did I say happy?  I was thrilled.  It was awesome!  But I wanted to make sure other people agreed with me, so I posted a preview of it in a few writing forums.  The response was overwhelmingly positive.  I had a winner of a cover.  I went to work, put it on a few print galleys, and started gearing up for the e-book distribution.

Then came the question that I should have headed off at the very beginning of my polls – What is your book about?

What’s it about?  Well, it’s a post-apocalyptic story about a small group of people who survive the nuclear aftermath of a war, only to find that there are still crazies in the world, and….

Wait, wait, wait!  You mean this isn’t a YA story about vampires?

Ummmm, what?

Well, you have a young girl, with a crossbow, at night…

Oh, crap!

I pulled that cover immediately.  As I recall, there are less than ten copies (I think there are six, actually) of the paperback version of HPM that have that cover.  If you have one, who knows?  Maybe it will be a collector’s item when I’m a world-renowned author!  LOL.

Cover art lesson #3 – Make sure your cover tells what your story is about.  It’s not enough for it to just look really good.  A potential reader needs to be able to look at the cover and get a pretty good idea what the story is about.  If I had gone with that original cover and people had begun buying my book thinking it was a YA vampire book, I can’t imagine how many folks I would have disappointed.

But now I had to come up with something quickly.  Something that told the reader immediately that this was not a YA vampire story, but an adult story set in a post-apocalyptic world.  I went hat in hand back to the artist, explaining my dilemma.  We went back to the drawing board, and finally came up with the cover that stayed on HPM for a year or more.  The mushroom cloud over the cityscape…

HPM final coverIt didn’t have all that much to do with the story, but someone looking at it definitely got the idea that this was a post-apocalyptic novel set after a nuclear war.  It worked well enough for about a year.  I did find out one minor problem with the cover during that time.  It turned out that the licensing for the stock photos used in that cover were only good for cover art.

Now, you may ask yourself, so what?  That’s all you should need it for anyway, right?  Well, as it turns out, no.  At least, not if you want to create promotional items like t-shirts, coffee mugs, mouse pads, etc.  As a result, I have a drawer full of t-shirts and mouse pads that I can never give out.  So…

Cover art lesson #4– Make sure of your licensing for the artwork.  It may cost a little extra, but if you ever want to give away any promo items, you must make sure you can legally do so.

Now, while I was learning these lessons, I wasn’t idle.  During that time, I wrote a short story for the Explorers: Beyond the Horizon anthology, and a novella “companion piece” to HPM called The Road to Rejas.  It was the story of one of the minor characters in HPM, and how he came to be in the novel.  And when I went to publish R2R, that brought me to…

Cover art lesson #5 – If there is any possibility of your story becoming part of a series, you must remember to bear branding in mind.  If you have several written works up for sale, the reader should be able to look at the covers and immediately tell which ones are part of the same series.  Unfortunately, it was going to be difficult to do this with the HPM cover I had at that time.

So I spoke to another cover artist.  Now, I had nothing against the first artist, but he was attached to a company I had decided not to go with again due to monetary considerations.  I had found that much of what they did, I could do on my own, and what skills I didn’t have were available for hire at a much more reasonable cost.  So I contracted with Glendon Haddix at Streetlight Graphics to do the cover for R2R, and to redo the cover on HPM, with the understanding that there would be another novel coming in the future.  Half-Past-Midnight-Print-Cover-6x9 The-Road-to-Rejas-6x9They came up with the fantastic covers that HPM and R2R have today, and there is already a preliminary for the upcoming sequel, Y12.  So look at these two covers.  Is there any doubt that the stories are related?

I don’t think so.  Color scheme, font style, symbols… all of these were used to great effect to link the stories in the reader’s mind.

So with all this history, you would think I would know what I was doing when it came time to get cover work for my next book, right?  Well… I’ll give myself a little credit.  At least I didn’t make the same mistakes I made the first time around.  No, this time I came up with completely new mistakes. :footmouth:

First of all, Streets of Payne was going to be completely different from HPM and R2R.  It was a different genre, different theme, targeted a different audience… it had a totally different feel.  So I knew I wanted it to look completely different from my other covers.  I also knew that I wanted a different kind of cover.  I was interested in getting some more expensive digital art.  Unfortunately, that was something that my previous cover artist didn’t do.  So I started the search back in July of 2012, when SoP was still a work in progress. I figured that would give me plenty of time.  I was determined that I wouldn’t be caught sitting on a practically finished manuscript, waiting on a cover before I could publish.

A fellow author put me on to an amazing digital artist she had found.  This woman didn’t stop at photo manipulation, she did digital art at another level.  I got contact information and told her what I had in mind.  She explained that there were several people ahead of me, and that it might take a while, but at that time, I anticipated that I wouldn’t likely be ready for the cover until the end of the year.  Since I had planned so far in advance, time was not an issue for me.  I told her that I didn’t anticipate completion of the novel until the end of the year, so that wouldn’t be a problem.  We exchanged a couple of emails, worked out details, and she sent me payment information.

Cover art lesson #6 – Never EVER pay in advance by Western Union.  If someone tells you that is the only way they will accept payment, find someone else.  There are other artists out there.  Payments via Western Union are non-refundable.  It is the equivalent of you handing cash to someone, without knowing them, or where they live, or what they will do with the cash once they get it.  You have absolutely no recourse if the deal goes south.

Now, you may ask, why did she need payment via Western Union?  Simple – she lived in Croatia, and it was the only way she could get money from the US.  Okay, maybe I was naïve, but I bought it.  I’m usually one to give people the benefit of the doubt.  And hey, I had plenty of time to work through any issues, right?  ?:-)  So after a few months of not hearing from her, I caught wind that several other writers were having trouble getting her to respond to email.  Then rumors started that she had been involved in an accident, and was starting to get back on her feet.  There was a thread on Kindle Boards wherein several authors expressed their dissatisfaction with her lack of response to their queries.  Some had missed deadlines and had to find other artists.  And then she posted on the thread herself.  She apologized, said she had been in a motorcycle accident, and had been unable to work for several weeks.  But she assured everyone that it was all behind her, and she was getting back to it.

Of course, she was way behind, but if we would all just be patient with her, she would get caught up in a few weeks.  Again I waited.  After all, plenty of time, remember?  By the time October rolled around, I was starting to get concerned.  I sent her several emails, none of which were answered.  I finally decided to put a little pressure on her.  I posted on that same thread in Kindle Boards all that I had been through with her.  That did two things… it brought the problems everyone had had with her back to the top of the forum again, reminding others that she had been a problem, and showed that I was still trying to contact her.

It worked.  She responded with an apology, indicating that her old email service had been canceled and that she had a new email account.  She sent me a private email, and promised me

Streets of Payne 06DEC2012

Streets of Payne 06DEC2012

preliminary work within a week.  It was November 27 when she finally got me something, but when she sent me the work, I was amazed.  We went back and forth a few times with minor changes I wanted, until she finally sent this cover in early December.  There were a couple of minor changes that she still hadn’t gotten, so I asked her to make them, and send me the licensing agreement so I could use the cover.  That was the last I heard from her.

She never responded to any other emails or chat requests.  Ever.

Cover art lesson #7 – No matter how talented the artist may be, if they have no business ethic, you can’t work with them.

I was SO frustrated!  Here was this absolutely fantastic cover, and I couldn’t legally use it.  I asked around, and no one else was able to get a response from her either.  It was like she had dropped off the face of the earth.

Again.

I later found out that she had sold another cover to a friend, then someone else bought the exact same cover from her!  Someone told me that this is legal in many European countries, that the artwork remains the property of the artist, and can be sold as many times as they want.  I have no idea if this is true or not.  I’ve already determined that I’ll never work under those circumstances again, so it isn’t of enough concern to me that I would spend time looking it up.  However, if you are…

Cover art lesson #8 – Make sure you know the licensing laws and other legalities involved in using the cover art you contract.  If you hire an artist outside of your native country, check to see if there are any international laws regarding the use of the artist’s work that might impact your novel.

By this time, I was getting pretty concerned.  What had started as a six month cushion, had dwindled to a matter of a few weeks.  In the meantime, I began corresponding with another author whose acquaintance I had made on a forum.  He had recently published his first book, and had been taken to the cleaners on editing.  I contacted him, letting him know how much I liked the story, but recommended that he get it professionally edited.  I put him in touch with my editor, and when he mentioned he also wanted to explore getting a new cover and having the manuscript reformatted, I recommended Streetlight Graphics.  I made an introductory call for him to Glendon, and during the course of our conversation I mentioned the problems I’d been having with the SoP cover art.  Well, it turned out that the type of digital “painting” that I’d been looking at was something he was interested in learning.

I was back in business!  I knew that Streetlight Graphics was completely trustworthy.  I knew they valued their clients, and their reputation, and were doing everything in their power to SoP001grow that reputation.  And I knew the way their licensing worked.  I showed Glendon the cover I had commissioned before, and told him how much I liked it.  But I knew I couldn’t simply have him go out and replicate the same cover.  I didn’t want there to be any possibility of some sort of copyright infringement.  So we went through a few false starts, and finally came to what you see here to the left.

I was torn.  I liked it quite a bit.  But something just didn’t feel right about it.  I couldn’t put my finger on it, but Glendon made it simple.  He said if I couldn’t look at the cover and say, “that’s what I want on my book”, then he didn’t want me to accept it.  We kicked around a few more ideas, and he explained that he thought we might be focusing too much on a particular scene or character.  He suggested going more with a concept piece, and started asking some questions.  A few days later, he presented me with a cover that blew me away.

Cover art lesson #9Streets of Payne 800 Cover reveal and PromotionalTrust your gut.  If something doesn’t feel quite right, figure out why.  Or, if you can’t figure out why, step back and punt.  It may be that you’re so focused on a particular idea that you’ve got tunnel vision, and are missing a wonderful idea that’s waiting just around the corner.

I know I’ve already shown the cover, but this post would be incomplete without finishing the evolution.  So…. there it is – the stories and lessons I’ve learned (so far).  I hope some of this might just help some of you avoid similar mistakes as you travel your own road to success.

And in the meantime, I need to get back to work on the newest work in progress.  Watch for an upcoming collaborative novel by yours truly and Edward Lorn, wherein we will explore the world of post-apocalyptic horror.  Chucklers – coming to a nightmare near you.  ;)